Myers Lecture Series

The Jeffrey and Joyce Myers Lecture Series was established through a gift from Dr. Jeffrey and Mrs. Joyce Myers. Their intent is to sponsor one lecture per academic year during the autumn quarter featuring a guest speaker from outside The Ohio State University with special expertise across the domains of optometry and vision science. Dr. Myers, a graduate of The Ohio State University College of Optometry Class of 1984, is a private-practice optometrist in central Ohio.

Observations Relevant to Treatment Strategies for Myopia


September 19, 2018 at 5:30 p.m. in Fry 33 at 338 W 10th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210

Earl L. Smith III, OD, PhD received his OD (1972) and PhD (1978) from the University of Houston. He joined the faculty of the UH College of Optometry in 1978 and during his tenure in the College of Optometry, he has served as the Chair of the Basic Sciences Department and as the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. He holds the Greeman-Petty Professorship in Vision Development and is currently serving as the Dean of the College of Optometry. His research interests are focused on the optics of the eye; Professor Smith received the Glenn Fry Award and the Prentice Medal from the American Academy of Optometry for his research on the role of vision in regulating refractive development and eye growth. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry, an ARVO Fellow (inaugural class), a member of the National Optometry Hall of Fame, a past Member and Chair of NIH NEI’s Central Visual Processing Study Section and a past member of NIH’s National Advisory Eye Council.

Video Links:

Our Immune System: Friend and Foe


September 27, 2017 in Fry 33 at 338 W 10th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210

Louis J. Catania, OD, FAAO, DSc (Hon) is an internationally acclaimed clinical educator, author, and recognized expert in corneal disorders, refractive surgery, and new eye care technologies. Currently, he is associated with Nicolitz Eye Consultants, a multispecialty ophthalmology group in Jacksonville, Florida. He conducts clinical research on evolving eye care technologies and immunology. Dr. Catania has been voted one of the ten most influential optometrists of the 20th century by Review of Optometry; was Primary Care Optometry News’ first Pioneer in Optometry Award; has received Distinguished Service Awards from the Ocular Surface Society and the Optometric Glaucoma Society; and was inducted into the National Optometry Hall of Fame in 2016.

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Hyperpermeability, Hyperosmolarity, and Contact Lens “Future Oxyopia”


October 25, 2016 at 5:30 p.m. in Fry 33 at 338 W 10th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210

Lecture by Dr. William Benjamin

William J. “Joe” Benjamin, OD, MS, PhD, is the Director of Advanced Refractive Care at the Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, P.C., located in the Highlands Building, Suite 501, at 1201 11th Avenue South in Birmingham, Alabama; and the President of Material  Performance Assessments,  LLC,  a  corporation  that  became  operational  on October 1, 2014. He is a clinician in contact lens practice and primary eye care and a clinically oriented researcher. His basic research interests include the physiology of the cornea and ocular surface, and are related to his clinical research and practice with prosthetic eye devices such as contact lenses and conjunctival inserts. Dr. Benjamin was the convener (chair) of the contact lens working group of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) for 15 years. He is an active member and Secretary of the Z80 Committee on Ophthalmic Products of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the primary editor/author of ANSI Z80.20 and ISO 18369 on contact lenses, former chair of the AOA Commission on Ophthalmic Standards and the AOA Seal of Acceptance Program, editor/author of the text Borish’s Clinical Refraction (now in its 2nd Edition), and an optometric member of the National Academies of Practice. He is the Immediate Past President of the International Society of Contact Lens Specialists and a former council member of the International Society for Contact Lens Research, holds a patent on an improved design for a conjunctival insert, and was a coursemaster of the contact lens series at the UABSO. He received the Dr. Josef Dallos Award from the Contact Lens Manufacturers Association, the Achievement Award from the Contact Lens & Cornea Section of the American Optometric Association, the Frederik William Herschel Medal from the International Society of Contact Lens Specialists, and  the Statesmanship Award from the ISO contact lens working group. He received sponsorship from companies and associations in 13 different countries and 15 different states in the USA, and has given presentations or conducted meetings in 25 countries and 27 states in the USA.

Dr. Benjamin obtained four degrees from the Ohio State University (BS 1977; MS and OD 1979; PhD 1982). In former lives he was Director of the Institute for Contact Lens Research at the University of Houston, tenured Professor of Optometry and Vision Sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry (UABSO), Director of his Eye Physiology & Ocular Prosthetics Laboratory, a Senior Scientist of UAB’s Vision Science Research Center, UABSO’s Director of Clinical Eye Research, interim Chair of the UABSO Department of Optometry, Director of the Professional Program, and Associate Dean of the UABSO. He and his wife, Dr. Patricia Benjamin, now monitor from afar the progress of their son, Daniel, a Materials Engineering graduate of Auburn University currently assigned to the Department of State in the Washington, D.C. area; and daughter-in-law, Jaclyn, a recent graduate in Forensic Science of George Washington University.

Links to video of the lecture:

Implementing NIH Requirements for Rigorous Experimental Design


September 17, 2015

Lecture by Dr. Mae Gordon
 

Dr. Gordon is a professor in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and Division of Biostatistics at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Dr. Gordon’s experience and expertise includes the development of outcome measures, risk modeling, in-home visual function testing, and the design and conduct of randomized clinical trials and observational studies. She is the Principal Investigator and Director of the Coordinating Center for the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS), a multi-center randomized clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health that definitively confirmed the safety and efficacy of ocular hypotensive medication in preventing glaucoma. Gordon and colleagues were among the first to identify central corneal thickness as a risk factor for the development of glaucoma.

Dr. Gordon, who has a doctoral minor in psychometrics, has developed new outcome measures such as the validated Glaucoma Symptom Questionnaire, a corneal scarring grading system, and the Pediatric Cerebral Palsy Visual Function Questionnaire. Her studies on patient adherence to glaucoma medication using an unobtrusive electronic eye drop monitor are still considered “landmark” studies.

Links to video of the lecture:

My 35-Year Meibomian Gland Odyssey and a New Paradigm


October 6, 2014

Lecture by Dr. Donald R. Korb
 

Donald R. Korb, OD, a trailblazing clinician-scientist best known for his innovative contact lens and dry eye research, is a graduate of the New England College of Optometry and fellow of the American Academy of Optometry, Dr. Korb divides his time between clinical practice and research, with 100 peer-reviewed articles and 50 U.S. patents to his name. He invented the CSI contact lens and the first membrane soft lens, and is co-inventor of Systane Balance, a lipid dry eye product marketed by Alcon, and Soothe XP marketed by Bausch+Lomb.

Dr. Korb has founded five research companies, including TearScience in 2006, dedicated to dry eye diagnosis and treatment where he invented the Korb meibomian gland evaluator; the LipiView, to computerize evaluation of lipid layer thickness; and the LipiFlow, an FDA-approved dry eye treatment.

In addition to being inducted into the Optometry Hall of Fame, Dr. Korb's honors include being a Regents Lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley; receiving the Dr. Donald R. Korb Award presented by the American Optometric Association Contact Lens and Cornea Section; and being awarded two honorary doctorates.

Links to video of the lecture:

Clinical Assessment of Vision and Visual Functionality


October 8th, 2013

Lecture by Dr. Ian Bailey
 

Ian Bailey was trained as an optometrist in Melbourne, Australia. After two years in private practice he travelled to London to gain extra training in contact lenses. There he began his descent into academic life, becoming a research student and graduate instructor for 2 years at The City University, followed by 12 months at Indiana University where he gained an MS degree.

He returned to the University of Melbourne in 1967 as head of the clinic and there he also taught a wide variety of classroom courses. In 1972, unplanned circumstances diverted his research interests from contact lenses to low vision. An impulsive resignation in 1973 led to a year on soft money doing low vision research with a talented new graduate student Jan Lovie. Prompted by a need for more secure employment, in 1976 Bailey took up his current faculty position in the School of Optometry at the University of California Berkeley. His research activities have concentrated on visual optics and visual psychophysics and there has always been a clinical motivation. His diverse contributions include work on measurement of visual acuity, reading performance, contrast sensitivity, measurement of the optical properties of low vision aids, prescribing methods, clinical scaling, orientation and mobility, face recognition, eye movements, glare sensitivity, visual ergonomics and illumination engineering.

Bailey has received many prestigious awards recognizing his contributions to clinical optometry and vision science. These include the Prentice Medal from the American Academy of Optometry, the Pisart Award from Lighthouse International, and an honorary Doctor of Science Degree from the State University of New York.

Links to video of the lecture:

Global Optometry: Making a Difference Growing the Profession


October 30th, 2012

Lecture by Dr. Kovin Naidoo
 

Kovin Naidoo, OD, MPH, graduated from the University of Durban-Westville, South Africa, where he obtained his Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Optometry degrees. He earned a Masters in Public Health degree from Temple University and a Doctorate of Optometry degree from the Pennsylvania College of Optometry. He is currently an Associate Professor of Optometry at the University of KwaZulu Natal in South Africa.

Dr. Naidoo is an academic, a former anti-apartheid activist and political prisoner, a Fulbright Scholar, and an internationally-celebrated public health leader. He was also elected an Ashoka Fellow for his social entrepreneurial efforts in addressing the needs of those less privileged. In recognition of his vast efforts, he was granted the African Optometrist of the Year Award in 2002 and the International Optometrist of the Year Award in 2007.

Dr. Naidoo is a member of the World Council of Optometry Governing Board, the Global Program Director of the International Center for Eye Care Education (ICEE), Head of the African Vision Research Institute (AVRI), Chair of the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness in Africa, Chair of the Red Cross Air Mercy Services, and the founder and Chair of the KwaZulu-Natal Eye Care Coalition to establish cataract surgical services in the public sector.

Links to video of the lecture:

Hope for Prevention of Diabetic Retinal Complications: the Journey


October 24th, 2011

Lecture by Dr. Tony Adams
 

Tony Adams, OD, PhD, serves as editor-in-chief of Optometry & Vision Science as well professor and dean emeritus at the University of California (UC) Berkeley School of Optometry.

Dr. Adams has been a Professor of Optometry and Vision Science (Physiological Optics) since 1968 and Dean of the School of Optometry from 1992 to 2001 at UC Berkeley. He was a member of the University of California President’s Health Sciences Committee from 1992 to 2005 and is an author of the Health Sciences Reports on UC Health education needs. His December 2005 appointment to the UC President’s Health Advisory Council advised the UC Health Education Planning for California in the coming decade.

Dr. Adams was a member of the Executive Council of the American Academy of Optometry (AAO) from 1991 to 2001 and was its President from 1998 to 2000. He has been honored with the Glenn A Fry, Garland W Clay, and Eminent Service Awards of the Academy and received its highest Award, the Prentice Medal for vision research contributions. He was a member of the National Advisory Eye Council from 1996 to 2000, a major consultative body for the Director of the National Eye Council (NEI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the US Secretary of Health and Human Services. He was appointed by the Acting Director of NIH to serve on the search for the new National Eye Institute Director appointed in 2001.

With NEI/NIH support over the past 30 years, Professor Adams has studied the early vision changes of diabetics and has revealed some of the earliest vision and retinal function changes of patients with diabetes.

Links to video of the lecture:

"The Development of Optometry"

October 14th, 2009

Lecture by Dr. Irvin Borish


 

Irvin M. Borish, OD, LLD, is an internationally known scholar in the world of optometry. Dr. Borish is known as the architect of optometry as his work has influenced almost every aspect of optometry for half a century. His accomplishments include that of educator, author, lecturer, clinician, and consultant.

Dr. Borish began his career on the faculty of the Northern Illinois College of Optometry, from which he graduated in 1934. In 1944 he opened a practice in Kokomo, Indiana. He was a member of the initial committee that founded the School of Optometry at Indiana University. After its inauguration in 1953, he commuted from Kokomo to serve as a visiting faculty member. In 1972, he retired from his practice to teach at Indiana University as professor of optometry, serving as director of patient care and teaching courses in clinical procedures and contact lenses until his retirement in 1982, when he became a professor emeritus. In 1982 he was appointed to the first endowed chair in an optometric institution, the Benedict Chair, at the University of Houston. Dr. Borish remained at the University of Houston until 1987. Upon his departure, the university established the Irvin M. Borish Endowed Chair in Optometric Practice. Dr. Borish still travels around the country guest lecturing.

The Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial:
"The Rest of the Story"


October 27th, 2010

Lecture by Dr. Mitchell Scheiman
 

Mitchell M. Scheiman, O.D., FAAO, FCOVD serves as Chief of the Pediatric & Binocular Vision Service and Professor of Optometry at The Eye Institute of the Pennsylvania College of Optometry at Salus University.

Dr. Scheiman is a Diplomate in Binocular Vision, Vision Perception and Pediatrics in the American Academy of Optometry, and a Fellow in the College of Optometrists in Vision Development. He has served on many national committees for the American Optometric Association and the American Academy of Optometry and serves on the editorial board of several journals. He has published over 100 journal articles and has written 4 textbooks.

Among Dr. Scheiman’s most notable achievement is his position as Chair of the Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT) since 2004. The Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT) was the first large scale, randomized clinical trial to investigate the eff ectiveness of vision therapy and required collaboration of almost 100 investigators from multiple sites, including both Optometry and Ophthalmology. His presentation, The Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial: “The Rest of the Story,” is designed to discuss the challenges and lessons learned, both clinical and political, from the initial planning stages through the publication of the primary outcome manuscript.

Links to video of the lecture: